test

This is what food insecurity looks like in the United States.
  • 1 in 7 Americans struggled to put food on the table in 2014.
  • More than 12 million families in America faced hunger in 2014.
  • 48.1 million Americans (14 percent of U.S. households) lived in food insecure households in 2014, which means about 48 million Americans were uncertain of having or unable to acquire enough food to feed every household member at some point during the year.
  • 15.3 million children lived in food insecure households in 2014.
  • 32.8 million adults lived in food insecure households in 2014.
  • 6.9 million U.S. households (5.6 percent) had very low food security and experienced hunger.
Very low food insecurity occurs when normal eating patterns of one or more household members are disrupted and food intake is reduced at times during the year because of a lack of money or other resources for food. These are hunger statistics by food insecurity level.

Food secure — Households that had access at all times to enough food for active, healthy lives for all household members. ­

  • 86 percent (106.6 million) of U.S. households were food secure in 2014.

Food insecure —  Households that were uncertain of having or unable to acquire enough food to meet the needs of their members because of insufficient money or other

resources for food. ­

  • 14 percent (17.4 million) of U.S. households were food insecure at some point during 2014.

Low food security — Households that had enough food to avoid substantially disrupting their eating patterns or reduced food intake by using a variety of coping strategies, such as eating less varied diets, participating in federal food assistance programs or getting emergency food from community food pantries. ­

  • 8.4 percent (10.5 million) of U.S. households had low food security in 2014.

Very low food security — Households where the normal eating patterns of one or more household members and food intake was reduced at times during the year because of insufficient money or other resources for food. ­

  • 5.6 percent (6.9 million) of U.S. households had very low food security at some time during 2014. ­ Unchanged from the 5.6 percent in 2013.
Very low food insecurity occurs when normal eating patterns of one or more household members are disrupted and food intake is reduced at times during the year because of a lack of money or other resources for food. These are hunger statistics by food insecurity level.

Food secure — Households that had access at all times to enough food for active, healthy lives for all household members. ­

  • 86 percent (106.6 million) of U.S. households were food secure in 2014.

Food insecure —  Households that were uncertain of having or unable to acquire enough food to meet the needs of their members because of insufficient money or other

resources for food. ­

  • 14 percent (17.4 million) of U.S. households were food insecure at some point during 2014.

Low food security — Households that had enough food to avoid substantially disrupting their eating patterns or reduced food intake by using a variety of coping strategies, such as eating less varied diets, participating in federal food assistance programs or getting emergency food from community food pantries. ­

  • 8.4 percent (10.5 million) of U.S. households had low food security in 2014.

Very low food security — Households where the normal eating patterns of one or more household members and food intake was reduced at times during the year because of insufficient money or other resources for food. ­

  • 5.6 percent (6.9 million) of U.S. households had very low food security at some time during 2014. ­ Unchanged from the 5.6 percent in 2013.
Very low food insecurity occurs when normal eating patterns of one or more household members are disrupted and food intake is reduced at times during the year because of a lack of money or other resources for food. These are hunger statistics by food insecurity level.

Food secure — Households that had access at all times to enough food for active, healthy lives for all household members. ­

  • 86 percent (106.6 million) of U.S. households were food secure in 2014.

Food insecure —  Households that were uncertain of having or unable to acquire enough food to meet the needs of their members because of insufficient money or other

resources for food. ­

  • 14 percent (17.4 million) of U.S. households were food insecure at some point during 2014.

Low food security — Households that had enough food to avoid substantially disrupting their eating patterns or reduced food intake by using a variety of coping strategies, such as eating less varied diets, participating in federal food assistance programs or getting emergency food from community food pantries. ­

  • 8.4 percent (10.5 million) of U.S. households had low food security in 2014.

Very low food security — Households where the normal eating patterns of one or more household members and food intake was reduced at times during the year because of insufficient money or other resources for food. ­

  • 5.6 percent (6.9 million) of U.S. households had very low food security at some time during 2014. ­ Unchanged from the 5.6 percent in 2013.